pattern mixing

long layers & pattern mixing

fall layers Pattern mixing, layers, and a little animal print, is one of my go-to recipes for interiors and entertaining, so it makes sense that it translates right into my wardrobe as well. Old Navy invited me to try share how I translate that look into my every day with pieces from their latest collection and I was pretty excited to find some that fit right in.

sss-long-layers5b sss-long-layers3 While I am actually not much of a sweater person, I can definitely do a midi length cardigan all day long. Thin knits are perfect for layering without adding too much bulk and, to me, keeping the length long feels a little more stylish than your average cardigan. By keeping the sweater light, it also gives you more room to play with layering on a scarf. I kept it casual by letting the ends hang loose, plus Archie likes to hide and play peek-a-boo in the long tails.

sss-long-layers2sss-long-layerssss-long-layers4sss-long-layers6 Subtle pattern mixing is the name of my game. Remember this tablescape? If I had to translate it into an outfit this one would be it. If you are looking to mix patterns but keep it subtle, one trick is to vary the scales of patterns and keep the color palette in the same family.

Pairing a small pattern with an oversized more graphic pattern is an easy win (like the stripe on the tank and the plaid on the scarf). I’ve also added in the third pattern, on the shoe, which scale-wise lands right in the middle of the two. So now I’ve got a small, medium, and a large. Varying the scale keeps the patterns from competing with each other and creates a balanced look.

Happy layered pattern mixing! x

Scarf // Tank // Long Sweater // Boyfriend Jeans // Shoes

Photos by Nicki Sebastian 

4 tips for pairing tile & bathroom progress

Many of my favorite bathrooms have tiled floors AND walls and since I love that look I thought I’d share what I look for in a good tile pairing. It’s essentially just like mixing patterns in your wardrobe, which I can never get enough of, and it’s even better when bringing it into the home.

4 tips for pairing tile in the bathroom // Capree Kimball // via sarah sherman samuelMy number one trick is to create balance with one small scale pattern and one large scale pattern. For example, if you have a detailed tile pattern with smaller shapes on the floor, choose a larger scale, simple tile (with no pattern) on the wall so it doesn’t compete with the floor. This bathroom by Capree Kimball illustrates it perfectly with the bold pattern on the floor and large subway tiles on the walls (see more of her bathroom here).

4 tips for pairing tile in the bathroom // Greg Natale // via sarah sherman samuelTry using a natural stone as a neutral pattern. In this bathroom, the wall commands all of the attention. Although they are small scale tiles, they make up a large graphic print and you wouldn’t want anything to fight with that. By using large marble tiles on the floor there is visual interest down there, giving it a rich layered look, but it reads as a neutral. The subtle irregular pattern on the marble is beautifully juxtaposed with the bold graphic pattern on the wall.

This bathroom is by Greg Natale, see more of his work here.

4 tips for pairing tile in the bathroom // via sarah sherman samuelA fool proof way to combining two tiles is to stick with the same color for both the floor and the wall, and only switch up the scale. You might remember that we did this in our last bathroom. This also reinforces my first tip where the scale of the floor tile is significantly smaller and more intricate than the scale of the wall tile and this way there’s no battling for attention. Each plane has it’s own pattern and they live happily next to each other.

Image from Target

bathroom tile pairings // sarah sherman samuelAnd finally, the tile I chose from Wayfair for the new bathroom also follows the opposite scale rule (this time large tiles on the floor and small on the wall), but I am using my final tip to mix two solid colored tiles of different shapes and let the grout lines make up the only patterns.

To catch you up on what is happening in said bathroom… last week I shared the beginning stages and plans for our remodel. Basically, everything was demoed and hauled out, an insanely messy job that I was a little sad I could be no part of this time around (growing a baby and construction dust probably don’t go so well together), and now the new tub is in place and the tile is going in!

bathroom-progresstile-progressmatte black tile // sarah sherman samuelIt isn’t much to look at yet, with no grout and the bathroom in shambles. BUT, the old shower is gone, they rebuilt that wall (pushing it back to make room for the larger bath and flipped around the shower head to empty into the tub), and you get the first look at how I’m laying out the tile in a herringbone pattern on the walls to compliment the large hexagons that will go on the floor. A whole new bathroom is just around the corner, eek (I HOPE)!!

To see the bathroom before check here.
To see all of the home renovation posts check here.

Product sources: White Retro Subway Tile from Wayfair // Black Hexagon Floor Tile from Wayfair // Kohler Bathtub from Wayfair

my (bump) style: stripes & plaid 2 ways

mixing stripes and plaid 2 ways // bump style // sarah sherman samuel27 weeks and counting with this bun in the oven! I can not believe the third trimester is here. Switching gears from my pattern mixing on the table to pattern mixing in my wardrobe, I’m sharing how to combine plaid and stripes two ways and both looks work with or without a baby bump. :)

mixing stripes and plaid 2 ways // bump style // sarah sherman samuelmixing stripes and plaid 2 ways // bump style // sarah sherman samuelmixing stripes and plaid 2 ways // bump style // sarah sherman samuelAdding a holiday worthy plaid to your wardrobe can be easy as layering on a scarf. The pattern is bold enough that even in a small accessory it makes a big statement. In order to keep the rest of the outfit from fading into the background I chose a graphic stripe to compliment the large plaid.

mixing stripes and plaid 2 ways // bump style // sarah sherman samuelmixing stripes and plaid 2 ways // bump style // sarah sherman samuelmixing stripes and plaid 2 ways // bump style // sarah sherman samuelmixing stripes and plaid 2 ways // bump style // sarah sherman samuelmixing stripes and plaid 2 ways // bump style // sarah sherman samuelFor this look, with the black skirt as a base I have added all the pattern on pattern fun on the top. To make the plaid and stripes mixing extra easy on this one, I’ve kept with the common palette of black and white. A combo I can’t seem to get enough of lately.

Look One Sources:  Scarf by Old Navy // Dress by Asos // Feather Bracelet by Monserat de Lucca // Ankle Boots by Matt Bernson

Look Two Sources: Pencil Skirt by Old Navy (the version I have is no longer available but can find similar here) // Plaid Blouse by Old Navy // Striped Jacket by Cartonnier from Anthropologie // Cuff by The 2 Bandits // Ankle Boots by Matt Bernson

This post was sponsored by Old Navy. Check out Old Navy’s latest fashion lineup in store or online at oldnavy.com.
Advertisement
Advertisement

connect with sarah
all content copyright © 2018 sarah sherman samuel